NON-PAYMENT INSTRUCTION SHEET

You should start a non-payment case when you want to get the rent from a tenant. If the tenant pays the money, the tenant can stay in the
apartment. If the tenant does not pay, you may be able to evict the tenant. Remember, it is illegal to evict a tenant or roommate without coming
to court after he or she has lived in the apartment for 30 days.

HOW DO I BEGIN

You or someone working for you, must demand the overdue rent from the tenant and warn the tenant that if the rent is not paid, the tenant can
be evicted. You can tell the tenant this in person or in writing. However, if the lease requires this kind of demand be given in writing, then it must
be in writing.
Remember, you should serve copies, never serve the original forms.

Serve a 14-day Notice to Tenant or 14-Day Rent Demand.

To find out more information, visit:
www.court.state.ny.us/courts/nyc/housig/interactive.shtml or the Do-It-Yourself forms provided by the New
York City Housing Court at  
nycourthelp.gov/diy/nyccivil_housing.html

The following forms are required in Non-Payment proceedings filed in New York City:

A.       14-DAY NOTICE OR 14-DAY RENT DEMAND . Check the lease for which time period is required. If there is no lease, a 14-DAY NOTICE is
proper.

B.       PETITION NON-PAYMENT

C.      NOTICE OF PETITION NON-PAYMENT and

D.      Postcard

STEP 1:   Demand the Rent

A.      Fill out form 14-DAY RENT DEMAND which says to the tenant: "If you do not pay the rent that you owe within 14 days, you will be brought to
court"

B.      Make photocopies of the completed 14-DAY RENT DEMAND. You are going to have a friend or a process server give the copies to the
tenant.
ALWAYS KEEP THE ORIGINAL 14-DAY RENT DEMAND. SERVE COPIES ONLY.

C.     If you did not use a professional process server, your friend who gave the tenant the 14-DAY RENT DEMAND must fill out the affidavit of
service on the back of the original 14-DAY RENT DEMAND form. The purpose of the affidavit is to prove that the server actually gave the court
paper to the tenant. The server is swearing to the fact that he or she gave the paper to the tenant. The server must sign at the bottom and have
the form
NOTARIZED. After the copy of 14-DAY RENT DEMAND has been delivered and the affidavit is complete, you will keep the original form
until the 14 day period is over.



STEP 2:   Start the Case if the Tenant Has Not Paid the Rent

A.        If the tenant has not paid after the 14 day period is over, fill out forms the NOTICE OF PETITION NON-PAYMENT and PETITION
NON-PAYMENT. The PETITION NON-PAYMENT must be
SIGNED  and  NOTARIZED. Make a copy of the completed NOTICE OF PETITION
NON-PAYMENT and PETITION NON-PAYMENT before you bring them to court.

B.       Bring all the forms, including the original 14-DAY RENT DEMAND, to the cashier's window where you will pay $45.00 to buy an index
number. You can pay by cash, certified check or money order made out to the Clerk of the Civil Court.
 

C.      The Clerk will give you back the original NOTICE OF PETITION NON-PAYMENT with Index Number stamped on it. Make a copy of the
numbered
NOTICE OF PETITION NON-PAYMENT, put that copy together with the copies of the PETITION NON-PAYMENT, 14-DAY RENT
DEMAND
and Affidavit of Service, and have a process server serve the tenant with the copies.  

D.      Bring the original NOTICE OF PETITION NON-PAYMENT, together with the notarized Affidavit of Service filled out by your server back to
court  within three (3) days of service. In addition, you will need to bring the postcard(s)
with postage so that the court can mail it to the tenant.

E.      If the tenant answers, you should receive a postcard from the court stating the date, time and place of the hearing. If the tenant does not
answer the Notice of Petition in court within five days from the date that service is complete, you may request that the court enter a default
judgment against the tenant for Failure to Answer. Call a City Marshal and give your request for judgment to the Marshal. You will
also need to complete a Non-Military Affidavit. The Marshal will request a warrant of eviction from court.

F.       Be sure to keep copies of all papers filed in court.

Process Servers for New York City:
Queens, Brooklyn, Manhattan and Bronx.
Tel.: 718-277-2968             Fax: 347-295-0244
Tel.: 718-345-0244     
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TERMINATION OF TENANCY IN NEW YORK. NEW LAWS AND PROCEDURES:

If you decide to terminate tenancy...

GET a 30-DAY NOTICE, a 60-DAY NOTICE, or a 90-DAY NOTICE or  A 120-DAY NOTICE and fill out the other forms online for free if eligible. New
LT Laws require that you give tenants ample time if you are terminating tenancy:

"A 60-day notice is required for renters who have lived in an apartment for more than one year, but less than two years, or have a lease of
at least one year, but less than two years. Tenants who have lived in a unit for more than two years, or have a lease of at least two years,
must get a 90-day notice", New York Times, June 21, 2019.